News

Bright Street Housing Co-op wins National Award

Posted on Friday, February 10, 2017, by Chris Donnelly


The Bright Street Housing Cooperative has been selected for the 2017 Audrey Nelson Community Development Achievement Award from the National Community Development Association. Bright Street Housing Co-op is a new, 40 home development created by Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont in Burlington’s Old North End. The City of Burlington and its Community and Economic Development Office, which sponsored the award, will be recognized on February 17 at a ceremony in Washington, DC on behalf of the co-op. It was one of six other communities selected to receive the award.

“One of the primary focuses of this Administration has been on addressing Burlington’s affordable housing crisis,” said Mayor Miro Weinberger. “The City was pleased to support Champlain Housing Trust and Housing Vermont in the creation of 40 much-needed units that will provide homes for families and individuals from a range of backgrounds and income levels. We are thrilled that the product of this partnership has been recognized by the national Audrey Nelson Community Development Achievement Award.”

The co-op received funding through the City’s Community Development Grant program, its HOME allocation and the Burlington Housing Trust Fund, as well state and national sources such as the Vermont Housing & Conservation Board, tax credits allocated by the Vermont Housing Finance Agency, and NeighborWorks America. The TD Charitable Foundation selected Bright Street as a winner in its annual Housing for Everyone competition.

Residents moved in this past fall, following a large community ribbon cutting celebration which coincided with a trip to Burlington from then-HUD Secretary Julian Castro, organized by Senator Patrick Leahy.


Champlain Housing Trust to Buy Burlington Motel to House Homeless

Posted on Friday, December 09, 2016, by Chris Donnelly

The Champlain Housing Trust (CHT) and University of Vermont Medical Center announced a new effort today to address homelessness through an innovative partnership that deepens the connection between housing and health care.

Using funds invested by the medical center, CHT will purchase and convert the Bel Aire Motel on Shelburne Street in Burlington into eight rental apartments to house people who are either frequent users of health care services or who are patients but no longer need hospital care. The apartments will house twelve residents who lack a safe place to call home in order to recover. Click here for Frequently Asked Questions [PDF].
The tenants will be supported by a caseworker from the Community Health Centers of Burlington. In addition to a capital commitment, the UVM Medical Center is pledging its support for operating costs. The same three organizations have collaborated on other successful efforts to reduce homelessness at properties in Shelburne, South Burlington and Burlington, with a video produced on the benefits of this partnership.
One such collaboration resulted in a 60% drop over one year in the cost of providing medical care to a small group of people experiencing homelessness, saving more than $1 million. The rate of homelessness has dropped by 31% in Vermont according to the most recent annual Point-in-Time count, much of this success due to these types of partnerships and new initiatives. The reduction came on the heels of seven years of growing numbers of people without a home.
“The purchase of the Bel Aire and conversion to apartments is part of a larger successful, coordinated strategy to house people experiencing homelessness,” said Michael Monte, COO/CFO of the Housing Trust. “The UVM Medical Center’s involvement has been critical and we look forward to transforming the property in the coming months.”
“These patients deserve to be in the supportive community setting they need to improve their health, and the Bel Aire apartments will provide that,” said Dr. Stephen Leffler, chief medical officer at the UVM Medical Center.  “Our mission is to work with others to improve people’s lives, and there is no better example than this collaborative approach to addressing a critical housing need.  This is exactly the kind of investment we need to make if we’re going to achieve the goal of improving the health of our communities while controlling costs.”
The property will be purchased by mid-December and renovations will be made over the winter with expected occupancy in April. The building will be converted into six studio or one-bedroom apartments, one 2-bedroom apartment and one 4-bedroom apartment. The apartments will house tenants with a range of supportive needs, ranging from case management to live independently to those who will benefit from medical respite – or patients who don’t need hospital care but who are unable to recover on the street or in tent encampments.
CHT will be submitting a permit for the changes to the property soon. The adaptation will bring the motel, currently a non-conforming use in the City’s zoning regulations, into zoning compliance. No additional buildings or construction to expand the foot print of the property is planned.

Ending Chronic Homelessness

Posted on Tuesday, July 12, 2016, by Chris Donnelly


Last year the Champlain Housing Trust made a commitment to end chronic homelessness in our region. This commitment was grounded in collaboration – working with a variety of partners to solve what has seemed an intractable problem. 

Collectively, we are making good progress, and there's a video below that describes some of this work, or you can click here to go straight to YouTube and see it.

Chronic homelessness declined 31% last year. Already this year, working with the Burlington Housing Authority and others, another 40 individuals or families experiencing homelessness moved into one of CHT's affordable apartments. 

But there’s more to be done. Harbor Place, the motel we've been running since 2013, still provides needed accommodations and services every night to dozens of people who have no other place to turn.

For taxpayers, homelessness is expensive: a study done in San Francisco showed it costs $80,000 each year in a myriad of programs to serve people who are homeless in that city. Providing housing with services costs 56% less – and results in increased stability, dignity and opportunity. 

Out of our efforts, new partnerships have evolved that have similarly shown immediate results, and promise lasting impact. The UVM Medical Center looked at data from the 95 patients they discharged to Harbor Place and documented a savings of almost $1 million in health care costs from these guests, along with a 42% reduction in Emergency Department visits and 68% fewer inpatient admissions. If we can demonstrate this type of result from a motel, we're certain that permanent housing will have even more of an impact. 

Our work with Community Health Centers of Burlington resulted in creating Beacon Apartments in South Burlington, a former motel CHT acquired and converted to 19 apartments for people who have been chronically homeless and with medical vulnerabilities. In the video below, you’ll meet John Graves, a Beacon Apartment resident – and former guest at Harbor Place, who speaks about how he now has a place to store his belongings and can aspire to get work. Safe Harbor provides case management with funding from the UVM Medical Center and Vermont Community Foundation.

Most of us feel compassion for those in need. Many agree there's a moral imperative to help. Even if we ignore these motivations, it's clear new approaches to addressing homelessness are needed. We've been spending more to keep people homeless than it costs to provide a home. 

More than hope, we have confidence. With the partnerships and collaboration underway, tackling big problems like ending chronic homelessness don’t seem so insurmountable anymore.


Coalition Launched to Increase Production of Housing

Posted on Monday, June 27, 2016, by Chris Donnelly

Dozens of Chittenden County leaders in the fields of housing, business, local and state government, and social services announced this morning a new campaign to increase the production of housing and setting a target of 3,500 new homes created in the next five years.

The new coalition, called Building Homes Together, was formed by the Champlain Housing Trust, Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission and Housing Vermont and released an initial list of nearly 100 community leaders supporting the effort. Several leaders shared words of support.

“Working together we will accomplish this goal,” said Brenda Torpy, CEO of Champlain Housing Trust. “For the sake of our communities, our workers and local economy, we will educate and advocate together for more housing.”

The housing shortage in Chittenden County has been well noted with unhealthy vacancy rates and high rents,” added Charlie Baker, Executive Director of the Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission. “Employers can’t find workers, and workers themselves spend more time in commutes and with a higher percentage of their paychecks on housing costs.”

Twenty percent of the 3,500 goal are targeted to be developed by nonprofit housing organizations. The remainder by private developers.

“This step-up in production will not just provide new homes and infrastructure for communities, it’ll be a boost to the economy and contribute to the tax base. Building homes together is a big win for all of us in Chittenden County,” said Nancy Owens, President of Housing Vermont.

The campaign will provide up-to-date data to the community on the need for and benefits of new housing, build cross-sector and public support for housing development, increasing access to capital, and supporting municipalities.

Individuals, businesses or organizations that wish to sign on and participate in the campaign are encouraged to by sending an email to Chris Donnelly at the Champlain Housing Trust. 

Building Homes Together Infographic

List of supporters (as of June 26, 2016)

What others are saying about Building Homes Together


CHT wins national Renewal Award

Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2016, by Chris Donnelly

Great news! The Champlain Housing Trust's shared equity homeownership program was one of six selected by Allstate and Atlantic Media, publishers of Atlantic Monthly and the National Journal, recognized with a Renewal Award at an event in Des Moines, Iowa Tuesday. For the past year, Atlantic Media sought out "prag­mat­ic prob­lem solv­ers from among loc­al gov­ern­ment, non­profit groups, small busi­nesses and or­din­ary cit­izens," and ultimately chose CHT as one of the six awardees. We are thrilled to be selected.

CHT's homeownership program provides help in the form of down payment assistance to people priced out of the market. Homeowners get their own mortgage and in exchange for the initial subsidy, they agree to share a portion of the market appreciation of their home when they decide to sell. This sharing keeps the home affordable for another buyer, but also allows owners to build equity from the pay down of their mortgage and a piece of market appreciation. The original subsidy has primarily come from the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board. Studies have shown that two-thirds of owners go on to buy in the market, and are 10 times less likely to fall into foreclosure.

“We are very thankful that Atlantic Media and Allstate selected Champlain Housing Trust’s shared equity homeownership program for recognition with a Renewal Award," said Brenda Torpy, chief executive officer of CHT. "Our program creates sustainable homeownership for low and moderate income families, leading to both security and opportunity for people who may have remained renters their whole lives. In this country, homeownership is still the primary way most folks build up assets. Our program has demonstrated success – often by breaking generational cycles of poverty – by giving people a shot at reaching the American Dream.”

There are almost 570 homes in CHT's shared equity portfolio, the largest in the country. In February, CHT anticipates the 1,000th purchase of one of our homes.

CHT Purchases Ethan Allen Apartments from UVM

Posted on Thursday, January 21, 2016, by Chris Donnelly

The Champlain Housing Trust announced today that it has purchased the Ethan Allen Apartments in Essex from the University of Vermont. The property, with 31 apartments in 11 buildings, was sold for $3.9 million.

“We are excited to acquire this property, and appreciate UVM’s desire to work with us to eventually create more affordable homeownership opportunity,” said Michael Monte, chief operating and financial officer for CHT.

The organization will offer existing tenants an opportunity to sign a new lease in June. Eventually, 19 of the 31 apartments will slowly be converted to affordable homeownership through CHT’s shared equity program.

The remaining twelve apartments will remain for rent, and will provide future flexibility for CHT to address affordable housing needs for people in need.

"Champlain Housing Trust have been ideal partners to work with on the sale of Ethan Allen Apartments,” said Annie Stevens, Vice Provost for Student Affairs at UVM. “We know that Champlain Housing Trust will be excellent stewards of this property and that they are committed to providing a smooth transition for the student residents and their families as well as assistance for their ongoing affordable housing needs.”

CHT is receiving financing for the purchase through Community Housing Capital, a national Community Development Financial Institution which serves as a direct lender to members of the NeighborWorks America network, like CHT. Most recently, Community Housing Capital financed a similar rental-to-homeownership initiative of CHT’s in Burlington’s south end. The university is also financing a portion of the sale.

More than a simple gift of bread

Posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

Earlier this week 19 loaves of homemade bread arrived at Harbor Place, CHT’s temporary, emergency housing motel in Shelburne. The bread was donated by 4th and 5th grade students of the Renaissance School, made possible through an innovative grant making program of King Arthur Flour called Learn Bake Share. The company donated all the ingredients, and the school incorporated bread-making into their math, science and reading curriculum. 

Students then brought enough ingredients home to bake two loaves – one for their family, and one that they shared with our guests at Harbor Place. "I felt good because I was doing something for a good cause," said one of the kids in the class.

"What a great project," one parent added. "(Our son) was so excited and felt empowered to teach us how to make bread. It was such a great way to spend time as a family."

While the gift of the bread is so generous by itself, all of us at CHT appreciate knowing that the bread was made by families this past weekend with compassion in mind. That makes us even more thankful.

CHT a finalist for a Renewal Award

Posted on Saturday, October 24, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

The Champlain Housing Trust's award winning shared equity homeownership program continues to get noticed. This time, CHT's program is a finalist in the inaugural Renewal Awards, which seek to recognize innovative solutions to American communities' pressing challenges. Presented by Atlantic Media and Allstate, the Renewal Awards will be presented to six organizations at the National Summit on Local Innovation in Des Moines, Iowa next January. Each winner will receive a $10,000 award, plus recognition at the summit. As part of the selection process, online voting is available until November 2 -- we encourage people to vote for the Champlain Housing Trust to help share with America what success we've had here building a stock of permanently affordable homes.

CHT's shared equity program, launched in 1984 under then-Mayor Bernie Sanders, has been long seen as a sustainable, innovative approach to affordable homeownership. A winner of the United Nations World Habitat Award in 2008 and a grantee through the Social Innovation Fund, shared equity homeownership, where buyers of limited means share market appreciation when they sell to keep homes affordable, is increasingly being seen as a way to better invest limited public funds to help people attain the American Dream. 

Home Sweet Housing Co-op

Posted on Friday, September 18, 2015, by Julia Curry

One of Burlington’s best-kept housing secrets is about to become better known!

On Saturday, October 3rd, leaders of housing cooperatives in Vermont and Montreal will explain how their co-ops work and why they love them. Co-ops have operated in Burlington for over 20 years and in Montreal for over 30, and new ones continue to form.

Housing co-ops offer self-determination, security, and a unique form of community. They may be apartments or mobile homes and may have 18 households or 100, but whatever their size and shape, they are democratically run by their members.

Bonus: Come learn about co-ops of all kinds! Tabling fair starts at 2pm in the lobby.

Home Sweet Housing Co-op: A Public Forum Saturday, October 3rd, 2015 

  • 2 – 3 pm    Cooperative business fair
  • 3 – 5 pm    Home Sweet Housing Co-op: A Public Forum

Contois Auditorium, Burlington City Hall, 149 Church Street


Shared Equity Homeownership Featured in National Publications

Posted on Monday, February 23, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

Shared equity homeownership, often through a community land trust like CHT, is getting noticed. We've known (and demonstrated [PDF-4.5MB]) that the program works to create homeownership opportunity for people of limited means, and that it's a growing response across the country to help people reach their dreams of owning their home.

Now, more mainstream national media outlets are taking notice. The National Journal, which in collaboration with The Atlantic, developed a new series they called the Next Economy focused on innovations. They've featured CHT's shared equity program on both of their websites (you can find them here and here). Soon after, the story was picked up by CNN Money, too.

The headlines might be a little funny, but the message of the article is clear: shared equity homeownership works, and is worth a deeper look as a sustainable option for creating new opportunities for the next generation of homebuyers.