News

Ending Chronic Homelessness

Posted on Tuesday, July 12, 2016, by Chris Donnelly


Last year the Champlain Housing Trust made a commitment to end chronic homelessness in our region. This commitment was grounded in collaboration – working with a variety of partners to solve what has seemed an intractable problem. 

Collectively, we are making good progress, and there's a video below that describes some of this work, or you can click here to go straight to YouTube and see it.

Chronic homelessness declined 31% last year. Already this year, working with the Burlington Housing Authority and others, another 40 individuals or families experiencing homelessness moved into one of CHT's affordable apartments. 

But there’s more to be done. Harbor Place, the motel we've been running since 2013, still provides needed accommodations and services every night to dozens of people who have no other place to turn.

For taxpayers, homelessness is expensive: a study done in San Francisco showed it costs $80,000 each year in a myriad of programs to serve people who are homeless in that city. Providing housing with services costs 56% less – and results in increased stability, dignity and opportunity. 

Out of our efforts, new partnerships have evolved that have similarly shown immediate results, and promise lasting impact. The UVM Medical Center looked at data from the 95 patients they discharged to Harbor Place and documented a savings of almost $1 million in health care costs from these guests, along with a 42% reduction in Emergency Department visits and 68% fewer inpatient admissions. If we can demonstrate this type of result from a motel, we're certain that permanent housing will have even more of an impact. 

Our work with Community Health Centers of Burlington resulted in creating Beacon Apartments in South Burlington, a former motel CHT acquired and converted to 19 apartments for people who have been chronically homeless and with medical vulnerabilities. In the video below, you’ll meet John Graves, a Beacon Apartment resident – and former guest at Harbor Place, who speaks about how he now has a place to store his belongings and can aspire to get work. Safe Harbor provides case management with funding from the UVM Medical Center and Vermont Community Foundation.

Most of us feel compassion for those in need. Many agree there's a moral imperative to help. Even if we ignore these motivations, it's clear new approaches to addressing homelessness are needed. We've been spending more to keep people homeless than it costs to provide a home. 

More than hope, we have confidence. With the partnerships and collaboration underway, tackling big problems like ending chronic homelessness don’t seem so insurmountable anymore.


More than a simple gift of bread

Posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

Earlier this week 19 loaves of homemade bread arrived at Harbor Place, CHT’s temporary, emergency housing motel in Shelburne. The bread was donated by 4th and 5th grade students of the Renaissance School, made possible through an innovative grant making program of King Arthur Flour called Learn Bake Share. The company donated all the ingredients, and the school incorporated bread-making into their math, science and reading curriculum. 

Students then brought enough ingredients home to bake two loaves – one for their family, and one that they shared with our guests at Harbor Place. "I felt good because I was doing something for a good cause," said one of the kids in the class.

"What a great project," one parent added. "(Our son) was so excited and felt empowered to teach us how to make bread. It was such a great way to spend time as a family."

While the gift of the bread is so generous by itself, all of us at CHT appreciate knowing that the bread was made by families this past weekend with compassion in mind. That makes us even more thankful.

CHT Responds to Safety Concerns at Harbor Place

Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

** UPDATED BELOW ** 

Last night the Shelburne Select Board hosted an open public hearing after hearing from residents about neighborhood safety concerns at Harbor Place, temporary emergency housing with services operated by the Champlain Housing Trust on Shelburne Road. It's clear to us that people in the neighborhood want to feel safer and have compassion for the homeless people that are being served at Harbor Place. We've prepared this letter to demonstrate our commitment to safety for both the neighborhood and the guests at Harbor Place, the steps we've taken and additional ones under consideration. Highlights of the letter include:

  • Harbor Place served almost 600 households in the first year, and because of its services and mission focus, people were twice as likely to find permanent housing than in the motel voucher program.
  • Public safety responses to Harbor Place have decreased by 20% in the first four months of 2015 compared to the same period in 2014.
  • Calls are made to the police because we've been asked to report criminal activity, and fugitives have been caught because we've been vigilant.
  • We've heard some rumors that we wish to clear up: we are not buying or looking for another motel to replicate Harbor Place, there has been no prostitution, and local realtors have told us that there has been no negative impact on property values.

Again, we understand the safety concerns from the Hullcrest neighborhood and others, and are committed to addressing them as we can. We want to continue to have an open dialogue with the Town residents and officials. As an additional step towards that goal, we are scheduling tours at Harbor Place: Sunday, May 17 at 10am and Tuesday, May 19 at 5:30pm. Space will be limited, so to reserve a spot please email Chris Donnelly, and let me know which date you'll join. If there is interest, we will schedule additional tours.

UPDATE

We've added two more tour dates: Monday, June 1 at 5:30pm, and Saturday, June 6 at 10am. Space is limited, so please email Chris Donnelly if you plan on attending. Thanks!

A Love Letter

Posted on Friday, February 13, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

The other day a man named Robert came into our office and gave us a note and a single red rose. The note was addressed to the staff, boards and donors of the Champlain Housing Trust, COTS, Burlington Housing Authority, and CVOEO. Robert was housed at Harbor Place for a period last winter, and now he lives in one of our affordable apartments in Burlington.

His note is a reminder of both the challenges people face, and the transformative nature of our work. Here's what Robert wrote: 

A love letter because of – You! 

Last winter I felt like I was going to freeze to death in my car, this winter I am alive and have a home of my own. 

Last winter I lived second to second, this winter I live day to day, month to month. 

Last winter I was cold, this winter I am warm. 

Last winter I was in the hospital ER 3 times, this winter no trips to the ER. 

Last winter I was living in my car, this winter I have a home. 

Last winter I was hungry, this winter I am well fed and helping to feed others. 

Last winter I did not have a bed to sleep in, this winter I do!

Last winter I was frightened every day of my life, this winter I am at peace most days. 

Last winter I was unhappy and wanted to give up, last winter and this winter you did not let me give up. 

Last winter I felt alone in the world, this winter I have people that care about me. 

Last winter my own family gave up on me, this winter you never gave up on me. 

Last winter I was sick, this winter I am getting healthier and getting stronger every day. 

Last winter I had no purpose, this winter I have purpose. 

Last winter I had no community, this winter I am part of the community. I belong! 

Last winter I needed help, this winter I am helping others. 

Last winter I was helpless, this winter I am helpful. 

Last winter I had no hope for the future, this winter I have hope for the future. 

Last winter I took a shower once a month, this winter I shower every day. 

Last winter I had wet dirty clothes, this winter I have dry clean clothes. 

Last winter my shoes were wet and cold, this winter my shoes are dry and warm. 

Last winter I felt unsafe every day, this winter I feel very safe. 

I can never repay all that your organizations, staff have done for me, but I can say I love you all for saving my life, and giving me a new life worth living. Thank you for making all of this possible and more. 

I will never forget your kindness and compassion during a difficult time in my life.

A New Challenge

Posted on Friday, January 16, 2015, by Chris Donnelly

We know that decent, safe and affordable housing is a key factor in determining health and well-being, both on an individual basis but also in our neighborhoods. We know this is true with people who are homeless, and that the chronically homeless present a special challenge in the provision of health care and supportive services.

We need to expand the supply of affordable housing with supportive services in a variety of settings that work.

In order to address this issue, the CHT has issued itself a challenge: create 40 homes with services for the chronically homeless and 30 homes for homeless families. To succeed, we will need to partner with several community agencies and funders. Our newest initiatve to meet this challenge is Beacon Apartments, a repurposed motel in South Burlington to provide permanent housing with services for 19 chronically homeless single adults who are medically vulnerable. Our partners on this effort are the Safe Harbor Clinic of the Community Health Centers of Burlington, and the Burlington Housing Authority.

Your Input Needed!

Posted on Wednesday, December 10, 2014, by Chris Donnelly

Every five years, the State of Vermont develops a "Consolidated Plan" to submit to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to guide use of approximately $10 million dollars in spending on housing, homelessness, and economic and community development. As part of this process, state officials are seeking public input to develop their plan. They especially would like input from residents of affordable housing or folks who have participated in our rehab loan program. There is a short, anonymous survey that can be filled out online.

Members of the public are also encouraged to attend public hearing at the St. Albans City Council Chambers from 4pm to 6pm on Thursday, December 18. For more information on the State's process and prior plans, visit the Department of Housing and Community Development's webpage.

Housing and Homelessness

Posted on Sunday, October 19, 2014, by Chris Donnelly

 

We had a 9% increase in homelessness in Vermont last year and while some of it is visible, many people are in hotels, hospitals, couch surfing or even in prisons without a home. In Opening Doors, Closing Gaps, we explore some of the challenges, data, and -- most importantly -- solutions we can pursue. It's the latest in our series of papers demonstrating the connection of housing with other public policy priorities or state government spending. The relationship between housing and homelessness might seem more obvious than say education or health to many, but we need renewed focus to solve the problem.

photo credit: www.matthewthorsen.com